Arabian Jasmine, aka, Sambac Jasmine, is an everlasting perennial tropical vine, which is most commonly known for its exquisite and intoxicating fragrance throughout the warm summer months. That beautiful scent is frequently released later in the evening to add some romantic vibes to your garden in your summer nights! Sambac Jasmine, usually, grows optimally in 8B zones, under full direct sunlight conditions and it thrives in good quality, loose, humusy and well-drained soil. This Jasmine variety, doesn’t require a very fancy water requirement, however, it does require a rich and fertilised soil, that drains well, in order for flowers to grow. With regards to its exquisite flowers, they are world-wild famous, not only for their fragrance, but also for their culinary uses, such as, being commonly used for tea in China or for their cosmetic uses to make perfumes or body lotions. Those flowers are born in clusters of 3-12, where the buds tend to fade from a pale pink beautiful tone to pure wax, glossy flowers, usually composed of 4 petals and reaching a size of 1-2 inches in size.

In this post we will explain how to propagate Arabian jasmine in water.
In this post we will explain how to propagate Arabian jasmine in water.

The way you can grow and root Sambac jasmine in water is by, ensuring to cut 6-8 inches long stems from semi established jasmine plants. To make sure the cuttings root in water, is to snip them below a node and above the node at the top of the stem. Right after that, you will need to remove all the foliage, except for top of the stem, where you may leave three leaves. The following steps, involve, placing the cuttings in a jar filled with water, which will be changed every two weeks for a total period of three months, where the successful rooted cuttings will be transplanted with or without hormone rooting powder in a pot.

Jasmine Sambac rooting in water

Before you get to propagate your jasmine plant, there are a couple of key points to know and nail down in order to reach success in the growth of our new stems. The very first thing you need to get right is to make sure you use semi ripe cuttings and particularly from more mature established plants. In order for you to get the best results, the second thing you need to do is to get those cuttings by snipping them below a node of the stems you are getting them from. It is best to use a really sharp knife and to aim for semi-hard stems, then, proceed to remove most of the leaves, especially, the most dried ones but do leave a couple of those leaves at the top of these cuttings, also remove old buds and flowers too, if those stems had some from the previous season. It is recommendable to do this at the start of the spring season, which is, when the plan really starts coming alive, as Sambac jasmine is a perennial plant which goes dormant in the winter time, so we want to avoid trying to propagate our plant at that time. A third key point is, to make sure you get serval cuttings, not just one or two as, propagating jasmine in water can be challenging, so make sure you get about 10 cuttings every time, in order to obtain two or three successful ones. The very next step is, to prepare a couple of transparent glass jars or containers filled up with water until about half way. Place the cuttings in those jars (make sure you dry up the bottoms of the cuttings from any extra sap that might have come out when snipping them). Place those jars in a location where it is somewhat humid, where there is enough indirect and bright light, but keep them away from direct burning sunlight. Grab a water spray bottle and keep the stems moist by spraying them every two days or so. Change the water every week, when at that time, it will look pretty murky and cloudy. And repeat this process for about three months, where you should start seeing a long white root coming trough, when it will be time to place it into a small soiled pot, where it will be resting for the entire winter. Then, in the spring time, it will planted properly in a bigger pot or outdoors soil. Propagating Sambac jasmine in water is an inexpensive, fun and mindful process when it comes to expand your Arabian jasmine stocks, as gardening can be pretty expensive when you look at more fancy techniques!

Succesful Arabian jasmine rooting in water jars
Succesful Arabian jasmine rooting in water jars
Sambac jasmine cutting ready to be potted after successful water propagation
Sambac jasmine cutting ready to be potted after successful water propagation

How do you propagate jasmine without rooting hormone?

I get this question constantly and it is a good question, as sometimes you have successfully achieved your cuttings to develop some roots in water after three months, but they are looking a bit sad and unwell to cope being planted in the soil. This is not very known, however, it is highly effective to give your cuttings grown in water, an extra push for them grow strong in the soil. The way this works is, once you have successfully obtained a rooted cutting that has spend about three months in water (just like we have explained above), you will need to dip the ends of the stems and the base of the root, in natural organic like hormone rooting powder. Examples of these natural agents are honey water, aspirin powder, cinnamon powder, fresh aloe vera gel. Once you have dipped those rooted cuttings in your agent of choice (I personally prefer aspiring powder, as I get better results using that versus honey) then, place a hole in the sand of your pot and place that dipped cutting in it, about three inches deep. Then, press the sand firmly against the stem but don’t push the cutting down the soil too hard, otherwise you may damage and destroy it. You could actually place two to three cuttings in the same pot of you preferred. After you have done this, place the pot in a dark polyethylene bag, don’t water the pot anymore and seal the bag properly to then place it in a warm place with shade. After about 10 days, open the bag, add a few drops of water in the soil and spray the plant once or twice before closing the bag again for the next 10 days. Repeat the process for about 10 to 12 weeks when you will be able to see a pretty well rooted solid pot. Now, your little Arabian jasmine pot is ready to be transplanted to a bigger container or a small area in your outdoor garden. Quick tips here for success are, to use river sand that is bacteria free and drains pretty well. Also, before you start, as you move forward in the propagation process, it is crucial that you sterilise your pruning tools by rinsing them with isopropyl alcohol or diluted bleach to clean them thoroughly and kill all the bacteria. In addition, when starting with those cuttings to put in water, make sure you don’t snip cuttings longer than 7-8 inches from around 8 months old plant, as if you pick really old plants, that success rate goes down a fair bit. In contrast, if you choose to use hormone rooting powder, the protocol here is basically the same. Right after your Sambac jasmine has rooted from being in water for about three months, the next step is to wet and dip those cuttings in hormone rooting powder, which is basically a chemical called Indole-3-butyric acid, which is the natural agent that promotes the rooting growth in plants. Posteriorly, place it in the potting or standard soil. It is key to be very gentle when you do this not to add too much hormone rooting powder and to push it too hard in the soil as the roots will wilt and the cutting will get damaged. The triumph of getting to grow successful baby Sambac jasmine cuttings is, to provide optimal levels of humidity and light/darkness. It is of good practice to cover the little pots with dark opaque plastic bags and to then place them in a location where they are going to be hit by indirect sunlight. After about 10 days to 2 weeks, you should remove that plastic bag for about 24 hours, so that your cuttings get some fresh air and dry up a little bit. Do not overwater these cuttings until the rooting system is well developed and attached to the soil, which will take about 6 weeks, otherwise, that soil won’t drain properly and the roots will wilt and grow nasty mould on them and this will ultimately lead your cuttings to die. Continue to do the bag changing process until you start noticing the first baby leaves coming through at the top of those cuttings, time when you will be placing these pots outside to get more indirect sunlight for an extra two weeks before planting them in the soil or a bigger pot.

Successful water propagation and further grown without rooting hormone powder. Honey water instead
Successful water propagation and further grown without rooting hormone powder. Honey water instead

There you go! now you know the best tips to successfully propagate Arabian, Sambac jasmine in water and the whole process from snipping the stems from your older plant to the end of the process when the cuttings are ready to be planted in bigger pots or outdoors area.

This article was published with these tags attached:

growth propagation cuttings
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